How We are Coming to Know

How we are coming to know: Ways in which Indigenous and non-Indigenous ways of knowing, being, and doing might circulate together in mathematics and science teaching and learning

The goal of this project is to conduct a meta-analysis (Gough and Thomas, 2016) grounded in the tenets of Indigenous research methodologies (Kovach, 2010) to report on developing understandings about the ways in which Indigenous and non-Indigenous ways of knowing, being, and doing might circulate together in mathematics and science teaching and learning, in K-12 and teacher education in Canada. The analysis considers how mathematics and science curricula that engage with Indigenous perspectives affect educational outcomes for all learners in Canada, and how Indigenous knowledge systems contribute to interdisciplinary collaboration and the breakdown of boundaries between subject areas in teaching and learning.

The primary sources for analysis are academic literature (gathered from research databases, journals, citation tracing) and grey literature (such as project reports, policy summaries, professional publications, NGO initiatives, and web sites). Given the commitment to reciprocity inherent in our own experiences of being alongside Indigenous people, peoples, and communities in research, we recognize that this analysis would be incomplete without inclusion of understandings held in community. These understandings are accessible only through conversation with a Circle of Advisors; individuals with whom we have been in relationship for many years (Elders, local knowledge holders, teachers, and other academics). Continuing our practices of doing this work in a good way, we plan to hold two online symposia with this Circle of Advisors so that important community understandings inaccessible through academic or grey literature inform the grant moving forward. As understandings from the analysis and the conversations emerge, the substance will be shared here.

The end goal of the meta-analysis is to bring these sources together as a means of summarizing the state of the field, mapping emerging themes, identifying emerging promising practices, locating gaps in understanding, and providing insights that might support educators (at all levels), researchers, and policy makers as they work to address the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s (2015a) calls to change the relationships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people, peoples and communities so that all people in Canada “can live together in dignity, peace, and prosperity on these lands we now share” (p. 13).

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